GOSSIP GIRL

 

The only thing thicker than blood is the ink on Page Six

While the entanglements of Gossip Girl’s eternally troubled socialites kept millions of viewers hooked for six seasons, it is the show’s depiction of New York City as a fantastical playground for the young, rich, and upwardly mobile that has made it a permanent fixture in pop culture. To envision the homes and hangouts of Blair, Serena, and their privileged posse, Christina, a native New Yorker, immersed herself in their world and let her creativity fly. “I rely on my instincts about what’s right for a character,” she says.

 

THE WALDORF RESIDENCE

“Welcome to our tasteful and appropriate home,” Eleanor Waldorf announces while guiding the crème de la crème into her Central Park-adjacent townhouse, bedecked with refined wallpaper and luxurious furniture. Embodying Upper East Side style and modern classic elegance, the Waldorf home is as timeless as Audrey Hepburn in a little black dress.

 Serena’s room (until Blair kicks her out) reflects the Golden Girl’s daring, passionate nature. The one-of-a-kind butterfly installation is the focal point of the room; Christina commissioned the piece, which is made entirely from aluminum cans, from New York-based artist Paul Villinski.

Serena’s room (until Blair kicks her out) reflects the Golden Girl’s daring, passionate nature. The one-of-a-kind butterfly installation is the focal point of the room; Christina commissioned the piece, which is made entirely from aluminum cans, from New York-based artist Paul Villinski.

 

THE VAN DER WOODSEN RESIDENCE

While Serena, Eric, Chuck, Bart, Rufus, Dan, Jenny and even Ivy live in the van der Woodsen penthouse at one point or another, it is first and foremost Lily’s domain. Christina worked with the Art Production Fund to curate just the right art collection for Lily, an Upper East Side beauty with a colorful past. Christina imagined that the former music photographer would favor edgy pieces like Elmgreen & Dragset’s “Prada Marfa” sign and the “slightly naughty” Ryan McGinley photograph in the dining room.

 

BLAIR'S ATELIER

The moment Blair walks into her brand-new atelier in season six, she exclaims, “this is divine. This is so me.” Indeed, the bright color story, eclectic collection of fashion and art books, and fearless wallpaper and upholstery choices speak to Blair’s maturity. She’s moved away from her mother’s classic style and muted palette and is experimenting with a bolder aesthetic.

CHUCK BASS RESIDENCE

The Upper East Side’s notorious lothario resides in a grand luxury hotel (that his father owns, obviously), so his space must be suitable for scotch with the boys and entertaining his ever-changing female companions. While Chuck’s suite is undeniably masculine and regal, Christina kept it fresh and fun, as well, with Maharam textiles (most notably, the orange couch) as well as teal felt on the pool table and pops of scarlet around the recreation area.

 

HUMPHREY'S BROOKYLN LOFT

“You know what’s really weird,” Blair says upon her visit to the Humphreys’ Brooklyn loft, “is that there’s a garage door in your room.” Maybe it’s a little out - there for Queen B, but the garage door fits perfectly into the Humphreys’ warehouse style. Christina commissioned custom industrial lighting fixtures, in addition to using various flea-market finds and a wall full of vintage records to evoke Rufus’ life as a touring musician turned Williamsburg gallery owner.

 

SPECTATOR OFFICES

Elizabeth Hurley and her Gossip Girl counterpart, powerful vixen Diana Payne, served as the inspiration for the New York Spectator office. The bold chandelier is dripping with Swarovski crystals; even the lighting fixtures exude sexuality and feminism (Christina calls them “power woman sconces”). Fun fact: Frank Sinatra’s mugshot in the waiting room is from his 1938 arrest for “seduction and adultery” – the charge for having an affair with a married woman.

 

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